Stuffed Creminis, Mushroom Soup, Red Cabbage & Apple Salad

Stuffed Cremini Mushrooms

Stuffed Cremini Mushrooms

In an earlier post I showed some wonderful Olive-Stuffed Portobello Mushrooms. Since I was making for only two persons I had, predictably, some of the stuffing left over. Well, it made a nice little snack on flax crackers, using it as a kind of pate, but there was still some left over and it was too good to ignore. Here came my Stuffed Creminis.

I wanted, however, to ring a change on the original stuffing – changing the balance of flavours for, well, for a change. What I did was add quite a bit more carrot and celery, some lemon juice and crushed chilies, and another handful of fresh basil – plus some other spices which I forget for the moment. Blended together with the left-over olive stuffing, this made a delicious stuffing for some smaller mushrooms. Into the dehydrator with them for 3 or 4 hourse, and we had the foundation of yesterday’s lunch.

To accompany that I decided on a Red Cabbage and Apple Salad to use up the last of a head of red cabbage that was weighing heavily on my mind. I shredded the cabbage finely in the food processor along with a big red apple, a tiny bit of onion, a hint of cayenne, some rice vinegar, a little mirin (agave nectar would have worked just as well) and a dash of ground cloves. Just right!

Red Cabbage & Apple Salad

Red Cabbage & Apple Salad

Okay, so it is a blurry photo, but you get the idea đŸ™‚

Before I go I want to mention a mushroom soup I tried for the first time out of Kristen Suzanne’s soup recipe book.

Mushroom Soup

Mushroom Soup

As you see, it was rich and creamy and absolutely wonderful. More about this and other soups another time! But first a peek at two of her recipe books, new on my shelves (well, here on a spare chair in my study!).

Two Recipe Books By Kristen Suzanne

Two Recipe Books By Kristen Suzanne

You’ll be hearing more about these too – especially as I am, some few weeks into this Raw Experiment, delighted with this way of eating. I wouldn’t have believed it, but I find raw foods not only delicious on the palate but also kind to the body. Others had told me I’d be ‘converted’ to raw if I tried it, but I was a skeptic. Not any more. I am not, obviously, one hundred per cent raw. For one thing, many of my herbs, spices and condiments aren’t raw. And we still now and then choose to have from ten to fifteen per cent of a day’s calories in non-raw form. Right now it suits both of us just fine!

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Olive-Stuffed Portobellos, Quinoa Tabouleh, Mushrooms & Green Beans in a Cheesy Sauce

Olive-Stuffed Portobello Mushrooms

Olive-Stuffed Portobello Mushrooms

These Olive-Stuffed Portobellos were the key dish in yesterday’s lunch. I found a recipe in (you guessed it) Kate Wood’s Eat Smart Eat Raw that I thought I could adapt to our particular needs (lower calorie, lower fat content, lower salt). This is what I made:

OLIVE-STUFFED PORTOBELLO MUSHROOMS

2 whole Portobello mushrooms, stems removed

1 medium carrot, chopped

1 medium stick celery, chopped

4 oz (in weight) pitted kalamata olives

3/4 oz (in weight) sundried tomatoes

3 Tbsp fresh basil leaves

3 Tbsp fresh Italian parsley leaves

3 cloves garlic

1 Tbsp flaxseed meal

1 Tbsp tahini

Put everything except the mushrooms in a food processor and puree. Place the mushrooms topside down and spread the mixture on the underside. Put in the dehydrator at 115 F for 4 hours.

We ate ours as soon as it was ready (I had prepared everything in the morning, so that it was ready to come out of the dehydrator by lunchtime), faintly warm and seeming for all the world like something cooked yet with better and fresher flavour than any cooked food ever has. We had a crisp green salad with these.

Earlier in the week, I had wanted something to go with the last of the falafel I had made earlier. (It made too much for us to have, so I froze around half of them – worked fine.) 

Falafel

Falafel

Here you see the falafel drizzled with a tiny bit of tahini and served with lemon wedges.

Tabouleh seemed  like an obvious match for this dish, but of course there was what I perceived as the grain ‘problem’. Then I thought of quinoa. (If you don’t know this wonderful grain – a grass, really, but works just like a grain and stands in for all sorts of things like couscous, rice, etc., do seek it out – it’s pronounced keen-wah. In addition to being a near-perfect protein it has a delightful flavour, not too strong, which complements so many dishes and, wonder of wonders, it can be cooked in about 15 minutes. All hail quinoa! We love it!!)

But where was I? Oh yes . . .

I soaked some quinoa for a short while – around 3 hours then sprouted it for about a day until it started to grow cute little tails. I used this instead of bulgur wheat in the tabouleh – see below.

Quinoa Tabouleh

Quinoa Tabouleh

This was was pretty simple: Cilantro with a little parsley (finely chopped, a tomato in a small dice, a little finely chopped onion, a little finely diced red bell pepper, lemon juice, crushed chilies (they seem to get into a lot of things around here), salt and pepper. (Everyone has their own tabouleh recipe and mine varies from time to time. I’d have used some mint, but didn’t have any.) The tabouleh was a great success with the falafel and I also added some mushrooms and green beans in a ‘cheesy’ miso sauce.

Mushrooms & Green Beans In A Cheesy Sauce

Mushrooms & Green Beans In A Cheesy Sauce

The mushrooms were cut to bite size and the green beans cut across in 1/4-inch slices. The sauce was simply miso, tamari, rice vinegar, mirin, pepper, and  nutritional yeast. Another success đŸ™‚

I also have a couple of delicious soups to tell you about, but that’s for another day. Happy munching!